All posts by Lisa

Loyola Fourtane: Studio Jewelry Among the Bohemians of Sausalito

Curious marks on a piece of jewelry started me on a journey into the world of mid-20th century bohemian California: why were the words “Lassen” and “Sausalito” engraved on the back of the brooch when Mount Lassen is hundreds of miles north of Sausalito?

As I looked closer at the piece, I could make out some other words: SS, Fourtane, Loyola. Thinking the SS stood for “Sterling Silver”, I ignored it. The mystery was solved when I discovered that Ed and Loyola Fourtane, husband and wife artists and studio jewelers, lived and worked in Sausalito on a former lumber boat, the SS Lassen, from the mid-1930’s until the 1950’s. read more

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Antiquing in the Bay Area: the Alameda Point Antiques Faire

Updated June 2015 to reflect new information 

Alameda Point Antique Fair

Alameda PointIMG_2557While this is no secret to anyone living in the Bay Area, the Alameda Point Antique Faire should be on the must-do list of anyone visiting the Bay Area who has an interest in vintage and antique goods.  Not only is it great for shopping, but this is also a market with a view:  the market takes place on an air strip at the former Alameda Naval Air Station and has a view of San Francisco, the Bay, and the giant cranes of the Port of Oakland as a backdrop. read more

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Making Lao Sausage with the “Meat Club”

The Meat Club


sausageFor the past couple of years I’ve been periodically getting together with a group of friends known as “The Meat Club” to make charcuterie:  pates, terrines, and various types of sausage.  We haven’t gotten together for about a year, since the great boudin blanc making episode, but re-assembled at my house on Sunday to make Laotian sausage.  During a previous get-together we made Thai sausage, which was a big hit, and we were exited to try a recipe which contained many of the same seasonings. read more

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Maker and Muse, part 2: the ASJRA Conference

Conference
ASJRA
Necklace by Sybil Dunlop

I recently attended the annual conference of the Association for the Study of Jewelry and Related Arts (ASJRA).  This year the conference was held in Chicago in conjunction with the exhibit Maker and Muse, Women and Early 20th Century Art Jewelry at the Driehaus Museum.  Elyse Zorn Karlin, curator of the exhibit, is one of the founders and co-directors of ASJRA.

Day 1
ASJRA
Mosaic fireplace surround at Driehaus Museum

The first day of the conference began with a tour of the Driehaus Museum and a curator’s tour of the exhibit.  Click here to see my post about the exhibit. read more

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Maker and Muse, part 1: Exhibit and Book

Maker and Muse Exhibit
maker and muse
Child and Child tiara
maker and muse
Stained glass dome in the Driehaus Museum

I recently visited the exhibit Maker and Muse, Women and Early Twentieth Century Art Jewelry at the Driehaus Museum in Chicago.  Curated by Elyse Zorn Karlin, author of Jewelry and Metalwork in the Arts and Crafts Tradition, the exhibit explores the multiple roles women played in the creation of early 20th century art jewelry as makers, patrons, and subjects.  About half of the 250 pieces in the exhibit are drawn from the collection of Richard H. Driehaus – founder of the museum – and half are on loan from other museums and private collections.  I was in Chicago to attend the annual conference of the Association for the Study of Jewelry and Related Arts (ASJRA) which was focused this year on the subjects covered in the museum exhibition.  For my post on the conference click here. read more

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Antiquing in Texas: Round Top

Round topI’ve wanted to attend the big antiques fair in Round Top, Texas for many years and finally did so this year. Known as “Antiques Weekend” or “Texas Antiques Week”, both are really misnomers as the shows take place over more than a two week span (March 21-April 5 in 2015, the year I attended).

During this time period over 60 separate shows take place in several towns about midway between Austin and Houston, with the greatest concentration in the towns of Round Top and Warrenton.  I stayed in Austin and it was about an hour and a half drive.  The shows are mostly strung along a 10 mile stretch of highway 37. read more

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The Women’s Travel Fest

I’ve always loved seeking out antique markets while traveling but when I started going on buying trips for my antique jewelry business a few years ago this became the focus of my travels, and finding great markets became critically important. Unfortunately, I found much of the information online and in guidebooks to be poor.  So I decided to fill that vacuum and share my discoveries on this blog and make it a resource for antique dealers, collectors, and travelers with a love of antiques. read more

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Building a Library of Jewelry Books: Art Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, and Jugendstil

art nouveauThe turn of the 20th century saw an explosion of new design movements throughout the world.  These movements go by different names in different countries:  Art Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, Jugendstil, Secessionist, Wiener Werkstatte, Sconvirke.  These movements also coincide with, or overlap, the Edwardian era which is named for the reign of King Edward VII in England (1901-1910).

art nouveau
Skonvirk Brooch

With the exception of Edwardian jewelry with its delicate tracery of diamonds and platinum, the other design movements are often characterized by the minimal use of precious materials; the emphasis instead is on flowing lines (sometimes contrasted with hard-edged geometry), color, and symbolism.  There are several excellent books on jewelry of this era: read more

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Antiquing in Florida: Summary Post

I’ve written several blog posts about antiquing in Florida and have created this post as a summary with links to all of the posts. I’ve also taken this as an opportunity to update some information in posts that were written last year.

Antiquing in Florida:  Antique Row, West Palm Beach
antique row
D. Brett Benson  Jewelry
Antiquing In Florida:  Palm Beach
Deja Vu
Deja Vu
Antiquing in Florida: Thrift Shops of Palm Beach County
Thrift shop
Palm Beach Gardens Goodwill
Antiquing in Florida:  Lake Worth
BKG Antique Mall
BKG Antique Mall
Antiquing in Florida:  Mount Dora
Mount Dora
Renninger’s Extravaganza
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Links From Around the Web: the Jewelry of Downton Abbey

Downton Abbey
Lady Violet’s Russian-inspired Tiara

There’s a fun article in the most recent newsletter of the GIA (Gemological Institute of America) about the jewelry created for the TV show Downton Abbey.  The article includes an interview with Andrew Prince, the jewelry designer for the show, where he discusses the historical precedents and inspirations for the jewelry and features lots of tiaras and hair jewelry.   Make sure to click on the the text at the bottom of each photo in the slide show to get detailed info about each piece shown: read more

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