Category Archives: Vintage Fashion and Accessories

Links From Around the Web: the Jewelry of Downton Abbey

Downton Abbey
Lady Violet’s Russian-inspired Tiara

There’s a fun article in the most recent newsletter of the GIA (Gemological Institute of America) about the jewelry created for the TV show Downton Abbey.  The article includes an interview with Andrew Prince, the jewelry designer for the show, where he discusses the historical precedents and inspirations for the jewelry and features lots of tiaras and hair jewelry.   Make sure to click on the the text at the bottom of each photo in the slide show to get detailed info about each piece shown:

read more

ShareFacebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather
FollowFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramby feather

Notes from Around the Web: Women and Fashion in WWI

WWI
Pre-war dress

The Kent State Museum contains an important collection of fashion and mounts exhibits with the goal of understanding world cultures through lens of fashion, textiles, and related arts.

WWI
Dress from 1918 with Shorter Silhouette


Their current exhibit (through July 5, 2015) is The Great War:  Women and Fashion in a World at War about changes in women’s fashions in response to WWI. The exhibit curator has produced a series of four 3-4 minute videos that show how women’s fashions changed in response to changes in women’s roles during the war and availability of materials:

read more

ShareFacebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather
FollowFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramby feather

Antiquing in England: Saltaire

Saltaire
Unusual hinged paste brooch
Saltaire
Deco silver and marcasite double-clipo brooch

Two years ago, on a buying trip to England, I attended the Saltaire Vintage Home and Fashion Fair.  Held in the town of Saltaire, on the outskirts of Bradford in West Yorkshire, this vintage show is held several times a year.  A medium-sized show with approximately 40 booths, I found several great pieces of jewelry including a wonderful dangling hinged paste brooch, an Art Deco double-clip brooch, a modernist ring, and a Ming’s brooch.

Saltaire
Ming’s Peony brooch

The Ming’s brooch was an unusual find for England as it was made in Hawaii in the 1950’s.  When I asked the dealer about it it turned out that she had bought it in California, near where I live; I, in turn, sold it to a collector in Hawaii.  This brooch had travelled the world for over 50 years and finally returned home!

read more

ShareFacebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather
FollowFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramby feather

Links from Around the Web: Mourning Jewelry

With the opening of “Death Becomes Her”, an exhibit of mourning attire at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, mourning jewelry is in the news.  Here is a round-up of some articles and exhibits across the country:

I love Lynn Yaeger’s writing and she just published an article on loaning mourning jewelry to the exhibit at the Met:  http://www.vogue.com/3296237/lynn-yaeger-jewelry-met-museum-death-becomes-her/

And here’s a link to the exhibit:  http://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-museum/press-room/exhibitions/2014/death-becomes-her

read more

ShareFacebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather
FollowFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramby feather

Charles James Exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

More often than not I’m disappointed by the exhibits at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  Rather than being in-depth studies of a fashion designer, style, or theme they often end up being product placement for the sponsoring designer. However the current exhibit, Charles James: Beyond Fashion, is everything I want in a fashion exhibit.  While I’m not sure what the curators mean by “Beyond Fashion” – as if the sublime clothing in this exhibit needs to apologize for being “fashion” –  they presented it superbly.

read more

ShareFacebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather
FollowFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramby feather

Repairs Made Easy: Conversions of Screw-back Vintage Earrings to Posts

Those of us who love vintage earrings are often frustrated to find that a newly-acquired pair is unbearably uncomfortable because of its screw-back or clip-back fitting.   If this were an occasional issue it wouldn’t be a big deal; however for the first three-quarters of the 20th century pierced earrings were out of fashion in many parts of the world.  For me, this time period encompasses many of my favorite styles of earrings:  long, elegant Art Deco earrings; Mexican silver hoops and enameled earrings; sculptural Modernist earrings; and dangling 60’s mod earrings.  While a jeweler can convert almost any pair of earrings to pierced, the cost runs at least $20-50 and sometimes higher.  While this is worth doing on some earrings, it can get prohibitively expensive.

read more

ShareFacebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather
FollowFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramby feather