Tag Archives: modernist jewelry

Loyola Fourtane: Studio Jewelry Among the Bohemians of Sausalito

Curious marks on a piece of jewelry started me on a journey into the world of mid-20th century bohemian California: why were the words “Lassen” and “Sausalito” engraved on the back of the brooch when Mount Lassen is hundreds of miles north of Sausalito?

As I looked closer at the piece, I could make out some other words: SS, Fourtane, Loyola. Thinking the SS stood for “Sterling Silver”, I ignored it. The mystery was solved when I discovered that Ed and Loyola Fourtane, husband and wife artists and studio jewelers, lived and worked in Sausalito on a former lumber boat, the SS Lassen, from the mid-1930’s until the 1950’s.

read more

ShareFacebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather
FollowFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramby feather

Links from Around the Web: Modernist Jewelry of the 1930’s

I came across a fantastic article about fine modernist jewelry of the 1930’s by Audrey Friedman of Primavera Gallery in New York:

Modernist Jewelry of the 1930’s

Audrey Friedman will be the 2015 honoree of the “Women of Estate and Antique Jewelry” award at next summer’s Antique Jewelry and Art Conference, better-known as “Jewelry Camp”.

Modernist Jewelry
Modernist Jewelry of the 1930’s: Coro Duette and matching bracelet
ShareFacebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather
FollowFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramby feather

Building a Library of Jewelry Books: Modernist Jewelry

Modernist jewelry“Modernist Jewelry” refers to jewelry produced by studio jewelers of the mid-20th century who were influenced by modern art movements; these jewelers were consciously breaking away from prevailing notions of “fine” and “costume” jewelry, intent on creating pieces that were miniature works of art.   The books below focus  mostly, but not exclusively, on work produced by studio jewelers in the United States.  However, it is important to remember that modernist jewelry was also produced in Scandinavia, Mexico, and other parts of the world and that manufacturers of both costume and fine jewelry were influenced by the studio jewelry movement and created pieces in the modernist style.

read more

ShareFacebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather
FollowFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramby feather